US intention to build new missiles is ‘extremely dangerous,’ says Kremlin

US intention to build new missiles is ‘extremely dangerous,’ says Kremlin

build new missiles

A Kremlin spokesman told reporters on Wednesday that US President Donald Trump’s intention to build new missiles is “extremely dangerous.”
It comes after Trump said on Monday that the United States would increase its nuclear arsenal until other nations “come to their senses,” threatening an arms race days after he said he would withdraw the US from a Cold War nuclear treaty.
Kremlin spokesman Dmitry Peskov told reporters on Wednesday that President Trump’s intention to build new missiles was extremely dangerous.
“This is an extremely dangerous intention … to get involved in an arms race, building up the corresponding potential of weapons,” Peskov said. “I repeat, this will make the world more dangerous.”
Trump told reporters on Monday that Russia had not adhered to the Intermediate-Range Nuclear Forces Treaty (INF). The 1987 treaty was seen as a watershed moment during the end days of the Cold War, helping to eliminate thousands of land-based missiles with ranges between approximately 300 and 3,400 miles.
He said his vow to increase the US nuclear stockpile included a posture against China as well.
“Until people come to their senses, we will build it up,” Trump said to reporters outside the White House.
“It’s a threat to whoever you want,” Trump said. “And it includes China, and it includes Russia, and it includes anybody else that wants to play that game. You can’t do that. You can’t play that game on me.”
During a conference call with journalists, Peskov also said the Kremlin had started preparing for a meeting between Trump and Russian President Vladmir Putin this November in Paris.
Trump said Tuesday that he would likely meet with Putin at next month’s Armistice centenary in Paris.
“I think we probably will. It hasn’t been set up yet but it probably will be,” he said.
Peskov added that both countries had discussed the possibility of Putin visiting Washington next year, but “with no specific decisions on the matter yet.”

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